Last edited by Meztik
Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

7 edition of Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence found in the catalog.

Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence

by Thomas Kuehn

  • 285 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by University of Michigan Press in Ann Arbor .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Italy,
  • Florence
    • Subjects:
    • Illegitimacy -- Italy -- Florence -- History.,
    • Paternity -- Italy -- Florence -- History.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 265-290) and index.

      StatementThomas Kuehn.
      SeriesStudies in medieval and early modern civilization
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsKKH9851.13 .K84 2001
      The Physical Object
      Pagination[xv], 305 p. ;
      Number of Pages305
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3939133M
      ISBN 100472112449
      LC Control Number2001005530

        Some thoughts on ‘race’ in the Renaissance, and a final reflection on my project By Emma Newman As I approach the end of my SURE project, I thought it would be a good idea to write an update on the research I’ve done over the last couple of weeks, with a focus on one of the most significant themes of Project Alex: race. ALBERTI ON THE FAMILY, BOOK III QUESTIONS FOR DISCUSSION Leon Battista Alberti, The Family in Renaissance Florence: Book III () translated by Renee Neu Watkins, pp. (Introduction), , , , (on instructing a wife), [83 pages total].

      Leon Battista Alberti was born an illegitimate, but nonetheless recognized, son of one of the most high-ranking and wealthiest Florentine families. He received a comprehensive education, and obtained his doctorate in law at the age of just 24 in Bologna, which at the time was one of the most famous universities in Italy. Early Renaissance commentators wrote of large numbers of illegitimate infants being thrown in rivers and on trash heaps, and their rhetoric led some modern historians (e.g., Trexler a and Trexler b) to link illegitimacy and abandonment as drivers in a cultural trend to infanticide; Tilly and Lynch find this assertion is not.

      Books shelved as historical-fiction-renaissance: Leonardo's Swans by Karen Essex, Blood & Beauty: The Borgias by Sarah Dunant, The Botticelli Secret by M. Florence first emerged as a republic in the early 12th century. A republic is a form of government in which the people of the state have a great deal more power and influence than they previously did under an absolute monarchy, which was the common form of government in Middle Ages r, in Florence, the republic did not last long due to several factors, including: economic strife.


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Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence by Thomas Kuehn Download PDF EPUB FB2

Supplementing this information are notarial documents and family account books. Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence places Florentine illegitimate children in a complete legal context, culminating in examination of several Florentine legal cases.

Thomas Kuehn shows how lawyers were called on to cope with and make legal sense of the actions and prejudices of Florentines toward their illegitimate Cited by:   Supplementing this information are notarial documents and family account books.

Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence places Florentine illegitimate children in a complete legal context, culminating in examination of several Florentine legal cases.

Thomas Kuehn shows how lawyers were called on to cope with and make legal sense of the actions and prejudices of Florentines toward their illegitimate Pages: "Thomas Kuehn has produced an excellent study of illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence.

Perhaps this book's greatest contribution is the melding of social and legal history to provide the reader with a fuller understanding of the complex position held by illegitimates in fifteenth-century Florence. Supplementing this information are notarial documents and family account books.

Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence places Florentine illegitimate children in a. Supplementing this information are notarial documents and family account books. Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence places Florentine illegitimate children in a complete legal context, culminating in examination of several Florentine legal cases.

Thomas Kuehn shows how lawyers were called on to cope with and make legal sense of the actions and prejudices of Florentines toward their illegitimate. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence book to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

On his showing, in Renaissance Florence there was not illegimacy, but illegitimacies. The book's trajectory moves from theory to practice. Kuehn begins with a thorough survey of illegitimacy in the ius commune and among jurists, whose rival consilia created a cloud of "indeterminacy" around it (69).

Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence / Thomas Kuehn. — (Studies in medieval and early modern civilization) Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN. Thomas Kuehn follows his earlier books on Florentine legal and social history with this study of illegitimacy in the fifteenth century, a topic which sheds new light on many important aspects of Florentine life, the interaction of ius commune and local enactments, the influence of jurists in interpreting law and moulding social practice, the role of the patrilineage, the inheritance of property.

Name Honour Property Thomas Kuehn Legitmate (sub patria potesate) legitimi et naturales derived by marriage legitimi tantum derived by adoption Illegitimate (no potestas) naturales tantum derived by concubinage nec legitimi nec naturales (spurii) vulgo quaesiti nati ex damnato.

Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence / Thomas Kuehn. Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence / Thomas Kuehn. Full View | HathiTrust Digital Library | HathiTrust Digital Library. Skip to page content; Skip to text only view of this item; Skip to search in this text About this Book Catalog Record Details.

Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence. 'The book complements Kuehn’s previous work on the intersections of law, family ties, women’s roles, illegitimacy, and issues of inheritance in Renaissance Florence which offers new avenues for scholarly by: 1.

[10] Thomas Kuehn, Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence (Ann Arbor, ). [11] Maria Serena Mazzi, Prostitute e lenoni nella Firenze del Quattrocento (Milan, ); Richard C.

Trexler, The Women of Renaissance Florence, Power and Dependence in Renaissance Florence, vol. 2 (Asheville, ). Heirs, Kin, and Creditors in Renaissance Florence. Family, and Women: Toward a Legal Anthropology of Renaissance Italy (); and Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence (). His scholarship has been published in journals as diverse as Renaissance Quarterly, for this book – Florence.

The city is a prominent fixture in studies of the. The four books of The Family in Renaissance Florence do not present a single, homogeneously bourgeois outlook. They are a monument of attitudes. Written as a dialogue, they express conflicting points of view, enabling today s readers to relive social and 4/5(1).

First published in by Harper & Row, The Society of Renaissance Florence is an invaluable collection of original Florentine documents dating from the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries and covering a wide range of subjects from taxes to social mobility, to family, death, and civic life, to violence, crime, and morality.

Also included are seldom seen documents addressing the state of. Renaissance Florence paid homage to the values and rights associated with freedom.

It was governed by a body of citizens rather than by a prince, and Florentines did not take their right of self-government for granted. Indeed, Florentines treated freedom as both prerequisite and ultimate expression of virtue. Yet, somehow Florence also was the scene of a burgeoning of urban-domestic : Orlando Patterson.

illegitimate, Law, Family, and Women provides fascinating evidence of the tensions riddling family life in Renaissance Florence. Kuehn shows how these same tensions, often articulated in and through the law, affected women. He examines the role of the mundualdus—a male legal guardian for women—in Florence, the control of fathers over their.

Buy Illegitimate Power: Bastards in Renaissance Drama by Findlay, Alison (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Alison Findlay. Readers of the revised edition of Brucker's Renaissance Florence (first ed.

; rev. ) will remember well his willingness to appreciate and absorb what were very recent shifts in the historical treatment of the society of Renaissance Florence from an emphasis on individual and nuclear family structures to one on class, corporate ties.

Other women were daughters of peasants, such as Domenica,contadina, the mistress of Niccol˜ Baldovinetti, [90]Apollonia d’Antonio of Impruneta, who bore an illegitimate child, [91] as did Tana di Pagolo di Giovanni da San Casciano, Gemma di Marchionne di Castel Nuovo, Mea d’Agnolo da Casentino, and Mea da Quarantola.

[92 Women of lower rank were more obviously available to men .Among his other books are “Illegitimacy in Renaissance Florence” (University of Michigan Press, ) and “Time, Space and Women’s Lives in Early Modern Europe” (Truman State University Press, ).

In The Black Prince of Florence () she recounted the brief and lurid career of Alessandro de’ Medici, the illegitimate son of a Medici duke .